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New York.- Students, parents, teachers and concerned community members who are fighting a proposal by Mayor de Blasio’s Education Department to close their neighborhood school - and evict 300 students - will march in protest Thursday from the school through the nearby business district. More than half of the students are from the Dominican Republic.

In an emailed statement, teachers James Donohue and Craig Moss   said students, parents, teachers and community members are outraged that the Education Department failed to even provide Junior High School 145 even the most basic staffing and resources, "and now plans on punishing the students for the failure of DOE bureaucrats."

They said their complaint was published by the NY Daily News

 "This is a 100% minority-student population in the poorest Congressional District in the United States, and it deserves much better than this from NYC," the teaches said.

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COMMENTS
17 comment(s)
Written by: lsantiago77, 16 Feb 2017 11:05 AM
From: United States
would love to see the gpa of these students
Written by: laman00, 16 Feb 2017 12:34 PM
From: United States, San Fernando valley, CA

Do they even know what GPA means??
Written by: Jeanarenas, 16 Feb 2017 12:54 PM
From: Puerto Rico
The title is meant to be incendiary. The reality is an understandable one. (No more welfare state)
Written by: Jeanarenas, 16 Feb 2017 12:54 PM
From: Puerto Rico
The title is meant to be incendiary. The reality is an understandable one. (No more welfare state)
Written by: Jeanarenas, 16 Feb 2017 12:55 PM
From: Puerto Rico
The title is meant to be incendiary. The reality is an understandable one. (No more welfare state)
Written by: bernies, 16 Feb 2017 3:52 PM
From: Dominican Republic, Juan Dolio
Can they at least give the name of the area where the school is located. Not having basic services at the school it doesn't mean that the students and the teachers has to perform bad, so maybe if they were doing good the school board wouldn't decide to closed the school down.
Written by: danny00, 16 Feb 2017 11:00 PM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university

Public schools in communities experiencing dramatic increases in immigrant populations are once again confronted with the enormous challenge of determining how best to respond to the needs of newcomers. As was true in the past, schools have received relatively little guidance in how to handle the task of integrating and educating immigrant children. Reports from schools and data collected on the performance of immigrant children indicate that many schools lack the expertise and resources needed to address their learning needs. In many school districts recent immigrant students have the highest dropout rates and lowest rates of high school graduation and college attendance (Rodriguez, 2014). They are also frequently overrepresented in special education, often due to a tendency in many districts to misdiagnose challenges in language acquisition as a form of disability (Figueroa, 2005
Written by: danny00, 16 Feb 2017 11:04 PM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university
drop outs from the dr? HAHAHAHA. wonder if they have teachers who can teach drug dealing and pimping courses.?
Written by: danny00, 16 Feb 2017 11:27 PM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university
Immigrants from the Dominican Republic were more likely than the overall foreign-born population in the United States to live in poverty, be Limited English Proficient, and have gained U.S. citizenship; they were less likely to have a college degree or to be uninsured.
Written by: danny00, 16 Feb 2017 11:32 PM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university
English Proficiency

Immigrants from the Dominican Republic were more likely to be Limited English Proficient (LEP) compared to the overall immigrant population (65 percent versus 50 percent in 2012). For the total foreign-born population from the Caribbean (which includes English-speaking Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago), the LEP share was lower (43 percent) than for Dominican immigrants.
Written by: danny00, 16 Feb 2017 11:35 PM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university
English Proficiency

Immigrants from the Dominican Republic were more likely to be Limited English Proficient (LEP) compared to the overall immigrant population (65 percent versus 50 percent in 2012). For the total foreign-born population from the Caribbean (which includes English-speaking Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago), the LEP share was lower (43 percent) than for Dominican immigrants.
Written by: danny00, 16 Feb 2017 11:39 PM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university
In 2012, approximately 12 percent of Dominican immigrants in the United States ages 25 and over had a bachelor's degree or higher, slightly lower than the Caribbean immigrant population overall (19 percent), and only half the share of the total foreign-born adult population (28 percent). About 45 percent of immigrant adults from the Dominican Republic lacked a high school diploma, compared to 31 percent of all immigrant adults.
Written by: danny00, 16 Feb 2017 11:47 PM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university
Data from the Institute of International Education show that 1,124!students from the Dominican Republic were enrolled in U.S. universities in the 2012-13 academic year, a 10!percent increase from the 2011-12 academic year. This share represents approximately 11 percent of the total student population from the Caribbean (11,100).
Written by: danny00, 16 Feb 2017 11:57 PM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university
don't be upset with me I'm only the messenger. put the blame on your govt and the parents
Written by: danny00, 17 Feb 2017 2:14 AM
From: United States, Rhodes scholar oxford university
BERNIES, and u worry about the location of the school does it make a difference?
Written by: DRmaker, 18 Feb 2017 6:17 AM
From: Canada, North Coast DR
danny00 says:

"don't be upset with me I'm only the messenger. put the blame on your govt and the parents"

While you are copying and pasting all this data danny00. How did your Dominican children do in school?

You know what I am talkin' about, man. After your Dominican ex-wife kicked your ass to the curb in the states and then she went back to the DR and took the children with her.

C'mon danny, let us know well your children fared in school?

Written by: Tuznik, 18 Feb 2017 4:24 PM
From: United States
Lets get real here . When kids in the DR go to school for 1/2 days only . They end up behind the rest of kids that go to school for a whole day when mom and pop come to America . If the parents had a good enough education they can bring those kids up to par at home . But the kids can never catch up to the kids tat did go to school all day .
They start out behind the pack . Plus some of these inner city schools should be shut down before they fall down . These kids were not abandoned . They were relocated to another school . No kids are just abandoned and thrown out in the street as this article imply's . It sounds to me like some teachers lost a job and the union couldn't do any thing about it . . Not kids getting tossed into the street .
America isn't streets lined with gold . Welfare doesn't pay that much . You have to work and work hard to get ahead . And take a few hard shots to get ahead . Stop whining ! And start educating your kids at home on top of a run down school
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