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Santo Domingo.- For the third time in as many decades, the Dominican Republic embarks on the titanic task of replacing the vehicle park in public and cargo transport as stipulated in the recently approved law to reorganize the sector.

The effort has precedents in the early 1990s with the creation of the ONATRATE bus system, and later in 2003, with Plan Renove, both initiatives ending in mass corruption and convicted and jailed transport sector leaders.

The new law sets a 10-year deadline for the newly created National Transit and Ground Transport Institute (INTRANT) to "gradually withdraw" the heaps called vehicles.

The various types of passenger and cargo vehicles in bad condition must be removed from Internal Taxes' (DGII) National Motor Vehicle Registry and "immediately demolished by INTRANT," the new law stipulates.

The Executive Branch must enforce the law "until reaching the maximum established lifespan," of 15 years for light vehicles of up to four passengers; 17 years, for minibuses of five to 20 passengers; 20 years, for minibuses from 21 to 26 passengers; 25 years, for buses from 37 passengers onwards; 30 years for heavy vehicles and 10 years for motorcycles.

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COMMENTS
5 comment(s)
Written by: DomRat, 15 Feb 2017 8:40 AM
From: Dominican Republic
The geniuses in government have set a life span on vehicles. They are equating a Volvo with a Skoda, a Harley with a Sung Yoo. Why don’t they just do some basic vehicle inspections on vehicles and operators as they are stopped and special checks on vehicles transporting persons., and base the penalties on the results of the inspection.
Written by: DomRat, 15 Feb 2017 8:41 AM
From: Dominican Republic
The geniuses in government have set a life span on vehicles. They are equating a Volvo with a Skoda, a Harley with a Sung Yoo. Why don’t they just do some basic vehicle inspections on vehicles and operators as they are stopped and special checks on vehicles transporting persons., and base the penalties on the results of the inspection.
Written by: ciber, 15 Feb 2017 10:39 AM
From: United States
Someone will make money on this decree and it will not be the car owners !
Written by: guillermone, 15 Feb 2017 5:33 PM
From: United States, Bring Back DT Forum

The age of the vehicle should not be the most important factor. The issue of greatest concern is public safety. We must focus on the overall conditions of the vehicle, then ask specific questions. How are the tires, lights, breaks, exhaust, seat belts and air bags? Although esthetics is also important it should solely be used as a tool for closer scrutiny, red flag to determine if a vehicle is truly road worthy.

The outer appearance of a vehicle on public roads should be the least of concerns or a secondary issue. However, in a country which lives off tourism we should take that into consideration. Dilapidated autos are an eye sore, and should not be allowed on the streets most definitely not in tourist areas. Lets use Germany as a guide, their cars must be in impeccable conditions, the least bit of rust will disqualify an auto to stay on the road. At least apply their standards for city driving and if you can't afford to keep a car in good shape, take a bus or subway
Written by: PuntaCanaMike, 15 Feb 2017 10:06 PM
From: Dominican Republic
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